Sunday, April 30, 2017

MAY 1, CDP THEME DAY: LET'S EAT!

A Bee's Feast

Bees, particularly honey bees, have been around for millions of years 
and are responsible for pollinating over a third of our food supply and 90% of wild plants. 

The dandelion, the bane of a lawn perfectionist, is one of the first available food sources in spring 
as bees and other pollinators emerge from hibernation. 
Each flower, in fact, consists of up to 100 florets, each one packed with nectar and pollen.

So remember, the dandelion you save, may feed the bees who may be pollinating part of your next meal.


Fortunately for the bees, I am not a lawn perfectionist, 
so the bees have a large swath of dandelions to feast upon in the early spring. 
And even when I do get around to mowing, the dandelions have been conditioned 
to lie low and avoid the mower.


Bees like honeysuckle, too, but apparently, the throats of many honeysuckle flowers 
are too deep for the honey bee to gather the nectar; 
however, I must have a smaller flowering variety that the bees like 
because they were out yesterday in abundance.


For more "Let's Eat!" photos by other CDP bloggers from around the world, click here.

22 comments:

  1. I've always rather liked dandelions.

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    1. Me too! We used to make dandelion chains with them as children.

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  2. I KNEW that you would select something different! My dad used to make dandelion wine, and I'm sure it tasted just as good as the bee's meal!

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    1. Thanks Kate. I take that as a compliment!

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  3. PS. With your colourful lawn, how popular are you with neighbours who cultivate a pristine lawn? :)

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    1. Fortunately, the dandelions are pretty much limited to the back yard which is totally enclosed by a combination of one or more of the following: fences, tall trees, shrubs and a creek. Plus, I don't live in a subdivision or a community with a list of rules. It's an older part of town within the city limits. One neighbor has chickens, most have dogs and/or cats, and there's a range of house and garden styles. So I'm safe.

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  4. Ahhh! You too have a Washington "country lawn." Wall-to-wall yellow and the flowers taunt any respectable mower.

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    1. A country lawn within the city limits. But it's still rural.

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  5. oh, that's a great post! with beautiful images.

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  6. What a great interpretation of the theme. I don't mind a bit that dandelions grow in my lawn, but I think it drives the gardener crazy. I like to feed the bees. They really enjoy my sages, too.

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    1. Actually, I'm an avid gardener, too. I don't like them in my flower beds, but don't mind them in the yard. Also, we have four dogs, so trying to keep a pristine lawn is not possible nor of interest to me. So the fact that dandelions feed the bees is a good enpugh reason for me to leave them in the lawn and focus my energy on my flower beds.

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  7. I've always liked dandelions - after all a weed is just a flower in the wrong place

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    1. Gerald, I agree! As a perennial flower gardener, I say that about most every flower I plant. Most flowers are just cultivated weeds.

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  8. Great take on this month's theme, and I thank you for living the dandelions to bloom and feed the bees!

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    1. Thank you and my pleasure. I used to fuss over them, but once I learned how important they are as an early food source to pollinators, I no longer stress about them. So it's a win-win!

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  9. I always give my wife dandelions for her birthday. She loves them and I have learned to love them too. It's nice seeing the bees working them over.

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  10. Wonderful post for the theme Susan! I never bother my dandelions, but my grandkids love to pick them for me.

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  11. I love seeing those busy bees!

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